Nicholas Blackburn

My Progress

I'm 50km this month to leave MS behind

My Progress

52.82km

My Target

50km

Support my challenge to leave MS behind!

I’m taking part in The May 50K challenge and will be leaving my limits behind to raise funds for life-changing research into multiple sclerosis!

Sadly, MS is commonly diagnosed in the prime of life between just 20 - 40 years old. I need your help to leave MS where it belongs, behind us. Research is the key to changing the future of MS and I’ve accepted The May 50K challenge to change lives.


For every kilometre I walk I will be sharing on my social media pages a fact about MS. 50km, 50 facts! You can follow me for these facts on:

Instagram: www.instagram.com/nickomatics/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/nickomatics/

2 facts down, 48 to go! 

Please make a donation to support my challenge.

My Updates

Fact 50. Together we are making the progress needed to one day stop MS.

We’re in this fight together and we’re talking MS from all angles. Researchers partner with organisations like MS Australia and MS Research Australia and work together with consumers (people with MS and their networks) to conduct ground breaking work. We’re researching better ways to diagnose, treat and understand MS, but we’re also researching ways to improve the quality of life of people currently living with MS.

Fact 49. No MS disease modifying therapy has been proven to be completely safe during pregnancy.

In Australia we apply a categorisation system for prescribing medicines during pregnancy. These categories are based on the available evidence of risks associated with taking a particular medicine during pregnancy. A number of medications for MS, both DMTs and those for symptom management are not recommended for use by women during pregnancy or when breastfeeding. It is always recommended that if a woman with MS is planning a family, or finds out that she is pregnant, that her MS medications are discussed with her neurologist.

 

Sources: Australian Government, Department of Health, Therapeutic Goods Administration: https://www.tga.gov.au/prescribing-medicines-pregnancy-database

 

Multiple Sclerosis Australia, 2020, Pregnancy and MS, https://www.msaustralia.org.au/publications/pregnancy-and-ms

Fact 48. There’s a complex relationship between pregnancy and MS.

As MS is often diagnosed in young adults, many people with MS will not have yet had children. During pregnancy, women with MS are less likely to have a relapse of their disease. However, the risk of relapse increases in the six months after birth. This is thought to be related to changes in hormone levels, particularly oestrogen, in the body during and after pregnancy.

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Source: Multiple Sclerosis Australia, 2020, Understanding Multiple Sclerosis – An Introductory Guide, https://www.ms.org.au/attachments/documents/publications/understanding_ms.aspx  

Dobson R, et al. 2019, UK consensus on pregnancy in multiple sclerosis: ‘Association of British Neurologists’ guidelines. https://doi.org/10.1136/practneurol-2018-002060

Fact 47. MS disease modifying therapies are administered through injections, infusions or orally.

Of the 15 disease modifying therapies used in Australia by people with MS, six are taken orally in tablet form, six are administered by injection and three area delivered intravenously (into the blood) by infusion. 

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Source: Multiple Sclerosis Australia, https://www.msaustralia.org.au/sites/default/files/Treatments%20summary%2023-4-21%20V2.pdf

Fact 46. 2017 – the first therapy for primary progressive MS approved for use in the US.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the drug ocrelizumab as a disease modifying therapy (DMT) in the United States for people with primary progressive OR relapsing remitting MS. This was the first DMT approved for primary progressive MS. In Australia, ocrelizumab is TGA approved but is listed on the pharmaceutical benefits scheme (PBS) for subsidising the treatment of relapsing remitting MS, but not primary progressive MS. MS advocate groups such as MS Australia and MS Research Australia have made multiple unsuccessful submissions to the Pharmaceuticals Benefits Advisory Committee to have ocrelizumab subsidised for treatment of primary progressive MS in Australia. 

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Sources: U.S. National Multiple Sclerosis Society: https://www.nationalmssociety.org/About-the-Society/News/FDA-Approves-Ocrevus

MS Australia: https://www.msaustralia.org.au/news-blogs/latest-news/ms-treatments-announcements-pbac-0

Fact 45. 1993 – the first effective disease modifying therapy for relapsing remitting MS.

In 1993 a clinical trial concluded that injection with interferon beta-1b was effective in the treatment of relapsing remitting MS. Targetting the immune system - this was the first disease modifying therapy approved for treating MS. 

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Source: The IFNB Multiple Sclerosis Study Group, 1993, Interferon beta-1b is effective in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Neurology, https://doi.org/10.1212/WNL.43.4.655

Fact 44. All current MS treatments target the immune system.

MS treatments, called disease modifying therapies (DMTs) are drugs designed to reduce the number and severity of relapses and slow or halt the progression of MS. Currently, all DMTs are designed to target the person with MS’s immune system to stop it from attacking the myelin coating around nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord. 

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Source: MS Society UK, Immune System and MS, https://www.mssociety.org.uk/research/explore-our-research/emerging-research-and-treatments/immunomodulation

Fact 43. MS relapses can last several days.

An MS relapse, which is the sudden onset of new symptoms or progressive worsening of existing symptoms, can continue for several days. Symptoms sometimes then plateau for several weeks and it can take weeks or months for the body of a person with MS to recover. Relapses are variable and unpredictable.

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Source: Multiple Sclerosis Australia, 2020, Understanding Multiple Sclerosis – An Introductory Guide, https://www.ms.org.au/attachments/documents/publications/understanding_ms.aspx  

Fact 42. MS is an invisible disease.

MS is often referred to as an invisible disease because many of the symptoms may not be immediately obvious to others. It can be difficult for people with MS to explain their disease and symptoms to others when they don’t “look sick”. This is why increasing everyone’s understanding of MS is so critical to the MS community. 

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Source: Multiple Sclerosis Australia, 2020, Understanding Multiple Sclerosis – An Introductory Guide, https://www.ms.org.au/attachments/documents/publications/understanding_ms.aspx

Fact 41. A goal of MS therapies is to prevent damage to the brain and spinal cord.

Healthy adults have a small amount of brain atrophy (the brain shrinking) as a result of natural ageing. This results in the brain tissue becoming irreversibly destroyed. In people with MS this atrophy is accelerated. Brain atrophy can even begin before the diagnosis of MS and continues throughout the disease course. One of the goals of treating MS is to slow or prevent this atrophy to retain healthier brains for longer. 

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Sources: Giovannoni, G. et al. 2017, Brain health: time matters in multiple sclerosis, Oxford PharmaGenesis Ltd, Oxford.

Fact 40. Per person costs are 276% higher for people with MS with severe disabilities.

The average total cost of MS for people without a disability is approximately $30,561. This cost increases substantially for people with MS with severe disability to $114,813 annually. 

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Source: More information about the direct and indirect financial costs of MS to Australia and to people living with MS is available in the report at: https://msra.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/health-economic-impact-of-ms-in-australia-in-2017_ms-research-australia_web.pdf

Fact 39. The annual total cost of MS per person increased in 2017 to $68,382.

The annual cost of MS per person increased in 2017 to $68,382. This was an increase from $58,652 in 2010, and was driven largely by increased costs to people with MS of disease modifying therapies. These cost was also offset by decreased costs of lost wages and decreased informal care costs. 

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Source: More information about the direct and indirect financial costs of MS to Australia and to people living with MS is available in the report at: https://msra.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/health-economic-impact-of-ms-in-australia-in-2017_ms-research-australia_web.pdf

Fact 38. People with MS with a severe disability have a much lower quality of life.

For people with MS who have a severe disability, quality of life is 41% lower compared to people with MS with no disability. The MS journey is different for every person, those with severe disabilities have a reduced quality of life primarily drive by the impact of MS on pain, independent living, mental health and relationships.  

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Sources: Multiple Sclerosis Australia released “A Roadmap to Support People with MS Living with Diability” in November 2018 available from: https://www.msaustralia.org.au/publications/roadmap-support-people-ageing-ms

 

“Health Economics Impact of Multiple Sclerosis in Australia in 2017” at: https://msra.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/health-economic-impact-of-ms-in-australia-in-2017_ms-research-australia_web.pdf

Fact 37. Most people with MS can expect 95% of the normal life expectancy.

While we know that the disease course for every person with MS is different, overall we know that MS itself does not drastically reduce life expectancy. Most people with MS can expect 95% of the normal life expectancy. 

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Sources: https://www.msaustralia.org.au/about-ms/types-ms

Fact 36. We need to support an ageing MS population.

MS Australia estimates that around 28% of all MS organisation clients across Australia are aged over 65. This means that there are at least 7,200 people with MS aged over 65. These people will need support to live well as their condition progresses and will need support to access services including home care packages.

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Sources: Multiple Sclerosis Australia released “A Roadmap to Support People Ageing with MS” in November 2018 available from: https://www.msaustralia.org.au/publications/roadmap-support-people-ageing-ms

Fact 35. Epstein Barr Virus infection (EBV) is a risk factor for MS.

The Epstein Barr Virus (EBV) is best known as the cause of infectious mononucleosis (also known as ‘mono’ or ‘glandular fever’) and most adults have been infected with EBV at some point in their lives. Infection with EBV is not currently thought to directly cause MS but it may contribute to an individual’s risk of developing MS. A vaccine for EBV could potentially prevent around 90% of MS cases.

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Sources: Amato et al. 2018, Environmental modifiable risk factors for multiple sclerosis: Report from the 2016 ECTRIMS focused workshop https://doi.org/10.1177/1352458516686847

Multiple Sclerosis Australia released a key facts and figures about MS summary in 2020, available from: https://www.msaustralia.org.au/about-ms/downloadable-resources/resources-available-different-languages

Fact 34. Low Vitamin D is a risk factor for MS.

Growing evidence from population studies has shown the lower levels of vitamin D, as measured from blood, are a risk factor for the development of MS. Sunlight is the natural source for our bodies to produce vitamin D. It’s thought that this may relate to the geographic gradient of MS (remember back to Fact 8) because people who live closer to the equator have higher sun exposure year round, and lower prevalence of MS. Vitamin D is also involved in the immune system, low levels decrease the function of the immune system, and we know the MS develops through our immune system. 

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Sources: O’Gorman et al. 2012, Environmental Risk Factors for Multiple Sclerosis: A Review with a Focus on Molecular Mechanisms. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms130911718

https://www.nationalmssociety.org/What-is-MS/What-Causes-MS#section-2

Fact 33. The strongest genetic signal for MS relates to the immune system.

Consistently multiple studies have shown that a genetic signal related to regulating the immune system is the strongest association with MS susceptibility. This signal is a genetic variant of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) gene complex called HLA-DRB1*15:01 and this variant is more common in people with MS than people who don’t have MS. This means that having the HLA-DRB1*15:01 genetic signal is a risk factor for MS, but it is also frequently present in people who never develop MS. This signal is just one part of the more complex MS genetics story. 

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Source: International Multiple Sclerosis Genetics Consortium, 2019, Multiple sclerosis genomic map implicates peripheral immune cells and microglia in susceptibility. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aav7188

Fact 32. 233 – the number of genetic signals identified for MS susceptibility.

The largest study of the genetics of MS to date (Fact 31) identified 233 independent signals across the human genome that were linked with MS susceptibility. Each of these signals itself only has a very small contribution to the overall genetic risk for MS, but together they point toward and highlight the importance of different cell types and biological processes in understanding MS susceptibility. 

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Source: International Multiple Sclerosis Genetics Consortium, 2019, Multiple sclerosis genomic map implicates peripheral immune cells and microglia in susceptibility. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aav7188

Fact 31. 115,803 – the number of people in the largest MS genetics study to date.

Reported in 2019 the largest study of the genetics of MS involved 47,429 people with MS and 68,374 people without MS. This type of study compares the genetic profiles of these two groups of people to identify genetic signals of MS that can help us understand why some people have a higher risk of disease than others. In a single person there are over 6.4 billion sites in the human genome where these signals may occur, meaning there’s a lot of (genetic) ground to cover!

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Source: International Multiple Sclerosis Genetics Consortium, 2019, Multiple sclerosis genomic map implicates peripheral immune cells and microglia in susceptibility. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aav7188

Fact 30. There’s a genetic risk for MS – but it’s complex.

There is not a single gene that ‘causes’ MS. We know that there is a genetic risk that contributes to the development of MS, but the size of this risk varies across different studies ranging from 15% to 72%. Understanding this genetic risk is a primary area of research in MS. 

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Sources: 

Hawkes & Macgregor, 2009, Twin studies and the heritability of MS: a conclusion https://doi.org/10.1177/1352458509104592

 

Westerlind et al. 2014, Modest familial risks for multiple sclerosis: a registry-based study of the population of Sweden https://doi.org/10.1093/brain/awt356

Fact 29. MS occurs when the immune system attacks the central nervous system.

In Fact 1 we learnt that MS is a neurological condition that affects central nervous system. MS is also an autoimmune condition where the immune system attacks nervous system, damaging the myelin sheath (the substance that insulates and protects the nerve fibres, remember back to Fact 2). The lesions that clinicians look for on MRI scans of people with MS (Fact 15) are focal areas in the brain or spinal cord where immune cells that normally protect our bodies from invading viruses and pathogens are instead attacking the nerve cells and causing demyelination. 

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Sources: Understanding myelin repair in the MS brain, 2021 https://msra.org.au/news/myelin-repair-in-the-ms-brain/

 

Bogdan et al. 2013, Pathology of Multiple Sclerosis: Where Do We Stand?  https://doi.org/10.1212/01.CON.0000433291.23091.65

Fact 28. MS is a uniquely human disease.

MS is a uniquely human disease which researchers currently cannot capture fully in animal models. We use animal models of disease in research to study diseases closer than we can in humans. This lets us understand the different biological components of the disease and even to evaluate potential therapies. There are certainly models for different stages of MS disease development, but no single model fully recapitulates this complex disease. 

 

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Sources: Burrows et al. 2018, Animal models of multiple sclerosis: From rodents to zebrafish

 https://doi.org/10.1177/1352458518805246

Fact 27. 1868 – MS is first clinically defined by French neurologist Jean-Martine Charcot.

There are documented reports of people with what we now think was MS based on their symptoms, as early as 1396, the first detailed clinical lecture on MS was from French neurologist Jean-Martine Charcot in 1868. In this lecture, building on work of his predecessors Charcot described from autopsy reports the neurological lesions of MS. 

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Source: https://mstrust.org.uk/a-z/history-ms

Fact 26. One in four (27%) of people with MS had an unmet service need.

The support needs of people with MS are diverse and there are opportunities within Australia to improve access to services. 27% of people with MS surveyed in 2019 had an unmet service need and this often arose from affordability (41%) or accessibility (25%). The people with the most unmet needs tended to be younger people who are living well but had need for better access to physiotherapy or massage therapy. 

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Source: Living with Multiple Sclerosis in 2019 report available from MS Australia https://www.msaustralia.org.au/file/1548/download?token=x6lZhWZ4

Fact 25. People with MS need support from multiple professional services.

The support network needed for people living with MS can be wide and diverse. 41% of people access four or more services including n eurologists, GPs, physiotherapists, massage therapists, MS or continence nurses. 

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Source: Living with Multiple Sclerosis in 2019 report available from MS Australia https://www.msaustralia.org.au/file/1548/download?token=x6lZhWZ4

Fact 24. The risk of developing MS varies with ethnicity.

The risk of developing MS is much higher in some ethnicities than others. Population studies have shown that Caucasian and Black populations have higher MS risk than Asian or Hispanic populations. Evidence is also now suggesting that MS risk is greater in Black women than Caucasian women. There are likely many factors that contribute to these risk differences, including exposure to different environmental risk factors, genetics, and even geography – with latitude a known risk factor (remember back to fact 8. The further away from the equator people live, the higher the prevalence of MS.)

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Sources: 

Albor et al. 2016 Ethnicity and prevalence of multiple sclerosis in east London https://doi.org/10.1177/1352458516638746

 

Langer-Gould et al. 2013 Incidence of multiple sclerosis in multiple racial and ethnic groups https://doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0b013e3182918cc2

Fact 23. Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor for MS.

Not only is smoking associated with an increased risk for MS, in people with MS it is associated with progression of the disease. Tobacco smoking is a modifiable risk factor; modifiable meaning that it can be changed or stopped. Smoking is a well-established risk factor for many chronic, preventable diseases. 

 

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Sources: 

O’Gorman et al. 2012 Environmental Risk Factors of Multiple Sclerosis: A Review with a Focus on Molecular Mechanisms 10.3390/ijms130911718

 

Hempel et al. 2017 A systematic review of modifiable risk factors in the progression of multiple sclerosis, https://doi.org/10.1177/1352458517690270

Fact 22. Families feel the effects of MS too.

Family members of people with MS are the primary source of support, taking on key carer roles. 69% of carers report that caring has an impact on family and their relationships. So our MS carers need support so that they can be the support! Tailored assistance for informal supporters is an emerging service need. 

 

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Source: Living with Multiple Sclerosis in 2019 report available from MS Australia https://www.msaustralia.org.au/file/1548/download?token=x6lZhWZ4

Fact 21. Quality of life is 31% lower for people with MS.

In Australia in 2017, people with MS on average had a quality of life 31% less than that of the overall Australian population. The reduction in quality of life is primarily driven by the impacts of MS on pain, independent living, mental health and relationships. 

 

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Source: Multiple Sclerosis Australia released a key facts and figures about MS summary in 2020, available from: https://www.msaustralia.org.au/about-ms/downloadable-resources/resources-available-different-languages

Fact 20. The heat sensitivity of MS can mean increased electricity use.

The heat sensitivity of people with MS naturally comes hand in hand with an increase in electricity consumption. A 2014 report showed that the households of people with MS use on average 16.8% more electricity in summer and 10.5% more in winter than the state or post code averages. Controlling the temperature at home and keeping it consistent for people with MS makes those electricity bills higher!

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Source: 2014 Report - Domestic Energy Use by Australians with Multiple Sclerosis including Medically Required Cooling https://www.msaustralia.org.au/file/2333/download?token=MaXM6owG

Fact 19. Heat sensitivity is a major problem for people with MS.

Most people with multiple sclerosis are intolerant to heat. Increases to their body temperature, even as little as 0.5°C can increase and worsen symptoms. This affects their ability to participate in work, family and social activities, and can increase their need for medical services. 

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Source: Multiple Sclerosis Australia released a key facts and figures about MS summary in 2020, available from: https://www.msaustralia.org.au/about-ms/downloadable-resources/resources-available-different-languages

Fact 18. MS impacts employment and income earning.

In 2019, market research conducted for MS Australia by KPGM identified that 64% of people living with MS report an effect of their disease on their employment and their ability to earn an income. For people with MS under 55 years old there was a 36% drop in full-time employment. Amongst many of the symptoms of MS, fatigue can have a major impact upon the ability for people with MS to work. 

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Source: Living with Multiple Sclerosis in 2019 report available from MS Australia https://www.msaustralia.org.au/file/1548/download?token=x6lZhWZ4

Fact 17. In Australia 170 nurses specialise in MS.

Across Australia there are 170 nurses who specialise in the clinical care of people with MS. For Australians that means 1 MS nurse for every 151 people with MS. These nurses are also likely supporting people with other neurological conditions. 

 

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The Multiple Sclerosis International Federation, Atlas of MS, 3rd Edition (September 2020), available from: https://www.atlasofms.org

Fact 16. In Australia 80 neurologists specialise in MS.

Across Australia there are 80 neurologists who specialise in the clinical care of people with MS. For Australians that means 1 MS neurologist for every 320 people with MS. These neurologists are also likely supporting people with other neurological conditions. 

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The Multiple Sclerosis International Federation, Atlas of MS, 3rd Edition (September 2020), available from: https://www.atlasofms.org

Fact 15. A MRI test is used to detect MS lesions.

A magnetic resonance imaging test (MRI) is used to create images of the brain, optic nerves and spinal cord to look for damage related to MS. This is an essential examination to allow doctors to view inside people to look for MS damage. This is a painless test, that uses a magnetic field to measure the amount of water in the nervous system tissue. Clinicians look for lesions (also known as scarring or damage) on the nervous system. These lesions appear as hyperintensities on the scans (bright white areas on the MRI), because these areas have more water content. Alone an MRI is not diagnostic, but it is supportive of an MS diagnosis. 

 

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Source: https://www.ms.org.au/what-is-multiple-sclerosis/newly-diagnosed/how-is-multiple-sclerosis-diagnosed.aspx

Fact 14. Diagnosing MS can take years.

There is no single medical test, symptom or finding that is diagnostic for MS. Because the symptoms of MS can be so variable from person to person often diagnosis involves ruling out all the other possibilities. 

 

While there is not a set formula for diagnosis MS there are two general ‘rules’ that are followed, as described by Multiple Sclerosis Limited. 

 

Rule 1: There must have been two attacks at least one month apart. An attack, also known as an exacerbation, flare, or relapse, is a sudden appearance or worsening of one or more multiple sclerosis symptoms, lasting at least 24 hours.

 

Rule 2: There must be more than one area of damage to the sheath that protects your nerves, called myelin. These are the scars or ‘sclerosis’ caused by the disease. The damage to myelin must have occurred at more than one point in time. It’s also important to ensure the damage hasn’t been caused by another disease.

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Source: https://www.ms.org.au/what-is-multiple-sclerosis/newly-diagnosed/how-is-multiple-sclerosis-diagnosed.aspx

Fact 13. 64% of people with MS use disease modifying therapies.

64% of people with MS are using disease modifying therapies (DMTs). DMTs are drugs designed to reduce the number and severity of relapses and slow or halt the progression of MS. 

 

The Atlas of MS (https://www.atlasofms.org) reports that there are 22 types of MS DMTs in use around the world. In Australia we use 15 of these DMTs to help people with MS. We are lucky that in Australia there are no reported barriers to accessing DMTs. However DMTs can still come at financial costs for people living with MS. 

 

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Source: Multiple Sclerosis Australia released a key facts and figures about MS summary in 2020, available from: https://www.msaustralia.org.au/about-ms/downloadable-resources/resources-available-different-languages

 

The Multiple Sclerosis International Federation, Atlas of MS, 3rd Edition (September 2020), available from: https://www.atlasofms.org

Fact 12. There is no cure for MS.

We have yet to find a cure for MS and this is an important and ongoing priority in MS research. While there is no cure, for some people living with MS disease modifying therapies are an option to improve their quality of life and slow disease progression. 


Source: Multiple Sclerosis Australia released a key facts and figures about MS summary in 2020, available from: https://www.msaustralia.org.au/about-ms/downloadable-resources/resources-available-different-languages

Fact 11. Every 5 minutes, someone, somewhere in the world is diagnosed with MS.

Based on data from 75 reporting countries the Atlas of MS (https://www.atlasofms.org) has calculated that around the world every 5 minutes, someone, somewhere is diagnosed with MS. The number of people diagnosed with MS is increasing, particularly when the Atlas of MS compared their current 2020 report to their previous 2013 report. However, the overall female to male ratios and average age at diagnosis are remaining similar, as does the regional distribution of where MS is more frequently diagnosed around the world. 

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Sources: The Multiple Sclerosis International Federation, Atlas of MS, 3rd Edition (September 2020), available from: https://www.atlasofms.org

Fact 10. There are 3 main clinical courses of MS, each with differing characteristics.

Around 85% of people with MS have the relapsing remitting form of MS (RRMS) which is characterised by clearly defined attacks followed by periods of complete or partial recovery. A relapse is a relatively sudden onset of new MS symptoms or worsening of existing symptoms that persists for more than 24 hours. This is the most common clinical course for MS.

 

Secondary progressive MS (SPMS) is a form of MS that begins as RRMS but transitions to a worsening of symptoms. There currently is not a way to determine when or if RRMS will change to SPMS. Around 50% of people with RRMS will develop SPMS within 10 years of diagnosis. 

 

10-15% of people with MS have the primary progressive form of MS (PPMS). PPMS has a progressive disease course from onset, characterised by worsening of symptoms over time without periods of remission.

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Source: Multiple Sclerosis Australia, check out this link for more information on the types of MS https://www.msaustralia.org.au/about-ms/types-ms

 

Multiple Sclerosis Australia released a key facts and figures about MS summary in 2020, available from: https://www.msaustralia.org.au/about-ms/downloadable-resources/resources-available-different-languages

Fact 9. The cost of MS to the Australian community in 2017 was an estimated $1.75 billion.

An economic impact report of MS in Australia published in 2018 by MS Research Australia and prepared by the Health Economics Research Group at the Menzies Institute of Medical Research. 


More information about the direct and indirect financial costs of MS to Australia and to people living with MS is available in the report at: https://msra.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/health-economic-impact-of-ms-in-australia-in-2017_ms-research-australia_web.pdf

Fact 8. The further away from the equator people live, the higher the prevalence of MS.

In Australia this means that the prevalence of MS is higher in the southernmost state of Tasmania than the northernmost state of Queensland. In fact, MS is twice as prevalent in Tasmania than in Queensland. Globally, countries closer to the equator have a lower prevalence of MS. This is called a latitudinal gradient. 


Sources: Multiple Sclerosis Australia released a key facts and figures about MS summary in 2020, available from: https://www.msaustralia.org.au/about-ms/downloadable-resources/resources-available-different-languages


The Multiple Sclerosis International Federation, Atlas of MS, 3rd Edition (September 2020), available from: https://www.atlasofms.org

Fact 7. Every person living with MS experiences the disease differently.

The symptoms of MS are highly variable meaning that each individual living with MS can have a different experience of this disease. Because MS affects the central nervous system, and the central nervous system controls the whole human body, symptoms can affect anywhere in the body. Symptoms can change over time - some symptoms worsen, others disappear, and new ones emerge. Some symptoms worsen in response to the environment, for example high heat.

Common symptoms include: fatigue, heat sensitivity, walking and balance issues, sensory symptoms and pain, bowel and bladder issues, anxiety, depression, sexual dysfunction.

Visit https://www.msaustralia.org.au/about-ms/symptoms to learn more about the symptoms of MS 

Fact 6. MS can also develop in children.

While rare, MS can also develop in children, under 18 years old. Globally at least 30,000 children and teenagers are living with MS. 


Sources: The Multiple Sclerosis International Federation, Atlas of MS, 3rd Edition (September 2020), available from: https://www.atlasofms.org



Fact 5. MS onset is usually diagnosed in young adults.

Most people living with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 40 years. That said, MS can occur at any age. The Atlas of MS reports that globally the average age of MS diagnosis is 32 years. 


Sources: Multiple Sclerosis Australia released a key facts and figures about MS summary in 2020, available from: https://www.msaustralia.org.au/about-ms/downloadable-resources/resources-available-different-languages


The Multiple Sclerosis International Federation, Atlas of MS, 3rd Edition (September 2020), available from: https://www.atlasofms.org

An early morning walk brings me 9.5km into my challenge.

5 more kilometres this morning as the sun rose in Montrose, so 5 more MS facts today! 

Fact 4. More women are diagnosed with MS than men.

In Australia around three quarters (75%) of people living with MS are female. Globally this figure is a little lower, around 69%, but the trend for more women diagnosed with MS than men is consistent across regions of the world. We don’t yet understand why this is the case, but research is actively underway to understand what factors are influencing this skew. 

 

I’ve drawn these figures from two MS reports. The first is from Multiple Sclerosis Australia who released a key facts and figures about MS summary in 2020, available from: https://www.msaustralia.org.au/about-ms/downloadable-resources/resources-available-different-languages

 

The second is from The Multiple Sclerosis International Federation, Atlas of MS, 3rd Edition (September 2020), available from: https://www.atlasofms.org

Fact 3. In Australia there are over 25,600 people living with MS today.

Based on figures from 2017 there are 103.7 people living with MS for every 100,000 Australians (or approximately 1 in 1000). This is called the prevalence of the disease. Prevalence is a standardised way of reporting the current impact of a disease on a population, it lets us put the total number of people in Australia living with MS into perspective with respect to the total population of Australia. 

 

Globally, there is an estimated 2.8 million people living with MS. This is likely an underestimate as the global reporting of MS diagnosis is incomplete in some countries. Globally the prevalence of MS is approximately 1 in 3000 people. But in countries with the highest prevalence this can be as high as 1 in every 300 people. 


 

I’ve drawn these figures from two MS reports. The first is from Multiple Sclerosis Australia who released a key facts and figures about MS summary in 2020, available from: https://www.msaustralia.org.au/about-ms/downloadable-resources/resources-available-different-languages


 

The second is from The Multiple Sclerosis International Federation, Atlas of MS, 3rd Edition (September 2020), available from: https://www.atlasofms.org

Fact 2. Myelin, which is a substance insulating nerve cells, breaks down in MS.

MS is characterised by the breakdown of a substance called myelin and this breakdown is what causes the many varied symptoms of MS. Myelin is the substance that insulates and protects the nerve fibres (called axons) between the nerve cells (neurons) in our central nervous system. Myelin is like the plastic covering of an electrical wire, it protects the wire beneath it. In MS there is a loss of myelin called ‘demyelination’ which affects the ability of neurons to send signals in the brain and around the body. 


*For some scientific information about myelin check out this open access publication from 2014 from R. D. Fields published in Cell https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2013.12.038

Fact 1. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neurological condition that affects central nervous system.

Fact 1. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neurological condition that affects central nervous system.

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neurological condition that affects central nervous system. The central nervous system in your body is the brain, spinal cord and the optic nerves (the connections between your eyes and your brain). 


*Learn more about MS with resources from MS Australia: https://www.msaustralia.org.au/what-ms

 

*Check out an MS medical review article from 2018 published in the New England Journal of Medicine by Reich et al. is open access through pubmed central: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6942519/

First 2 kilometres behind me!

I'm late starting my May50K challenge, the first few days of May I was moving into my new home. Beautiful weather today in Hobart so I stepped out before lunch to log my first two kilometres. 

And with those two kilometres I'd like to share my first two facts about MS!

Thank you to my Sponsors

$133.35

Patricia Blackburn

You had better walk it !!!!!

$133.35

Kathryn Burdon

$100

Nicholas Blackburn

$100

Ignacio Martinez

Rápido! 🏃‍♂️🏃🏃‍♂️

$100

Andrew Giles

$75

Margaret Reinbolt

Thank you so much for doing this Nick. May the Force be with you

$67.20

Jessica Borton

You're always going to be my favorite Doctor

$67.20

Brett & Maret Cannan

$64

Mazz And Dave

$55

Anonymous

$50

Maurice And Margaret White

$50

Belinda White

Go you!

$37.80

Chris Gourlay

Congratulations Nick, massive effort!

$25

Gustaf Wellhagen

Go go go!

$21

Siobhan Grady

$21

Deanne Wise

$20

Cindy Tarrant

Love your work Nick!

Our Team Members

Lynnette Riddell

Raised so far

$350.00

Angie & Damien Walking this together

Charlene Miller

Raised so far

$326.55

Bianca Lansdowne

Raised so far

$678.10

Robin Bode

Raised so far

$830.80

KB

Raised so far

$142.80

Tina Crellin

Raised so far

$37.80

Elissa

Raised so far

$66.05

Ingrid Stern

Raised so far

$92.00

Sara McKay

Shannon Coghlan

Kate Roberts

Raised so far

$352.50

Amanda Harris

Adrienne Lovejoy

Raised so far

$265.50

Sandra Currie

Raised so far

$150.60

Lynne Wells

Raised so far

$184.80

Rachel Gaudry

Raised so far

$155.70

Caris Fowke

Raised so far

$77.70

Carla Evans

Kate Bedford

Raised so far

$105.00

Julie Campbell

Raised so far

$40.50

Dione Smith

Raised so far

$123.50

Dan Waring

Sophie Revington

Raised so far

$1,333.85

60 isn’t for sissies.

Raised so far

$799.50

Kelly Makeham

Amber Perry

Raised so far

$3,243.15

Michael Nash

Raised so far

$1,821.35

Erin Robinson

Raised so far

$21.00

Gayle Macnamara

Raised so far

$26.25

Kath Welling

Raised so far

$67.20

Cathryn Jackson

Raised so far

$90.25

Rebecca Offord

Prudence Scholtes

Raised so far

$1,068.05

NICOLE BAILEY

Raised so far

$58.80

Cindy Dunn

Raised so far

$242.85

Amy Sonnberg

Raised so far

$1,061.60

Caren Harper

Raised so far

$73.50

Una Pianta

Raised so far

$443.05

Henry Bell

Raised so far

$536.55

Tahlia Tangey

Raised so far

$917.65

Annette Kelson

Raised so far

$293.00

Jodie Lancaster

Raised so far

$36.00

Tanya Price

Raised so far

$10.50

Laura Holme

Raised so far

$10.50

Kim Smith

Raised so far

$814.00

Brittany Holland

Raised so far

$207.75

Gracie P

Ashica Doss

Kristene Reynolds

Raised so far

$1,209.55

Michelle Rogers

Raised so far

$354.35

Megan Burnell-Armstrong

Raised so far

$474.80

Belinda Spiteri

Raised so far

$223.65

Catherine Leetch

Raised so far

$50.00

Julie Mabb

Raised so far

$144.50

Penny Rindel

Raised so far

$136.50

Garry Aydon

Raised so far

$64.00

Gemma Robinson

Raised so far

$1,389.25

Nicole Watts

Donna Cornish

Raised so far

$1,144.75

Harshida Sathis

Raised so far

$372.30

Bella Rizzoli

Karmen Elliston

Raised so far

$200.00

Bryan Bracknell

Raised so far

$315.45

Becca Spence

Raised so far

$761.55

Karl Swanton

Raised so far

$39.80

Norelle & Lillie 🐶 Meredith

Raised so far

$84.30

Carol Pettifer

Raised so far

$1,053.50

Cathy Hill

Raised so far

$2,395.00

Kelsea King

Raised so far

$1,232.20

Jason Bullivant

Raised so far

$901.15

Dalit Kaplan

Raised so far

$2,099.65

Richard Moore

Debbie Kay

Raised so far

$37.80

Lisa Orevich

Raised so far

$153.30

Michelle Cameron

Raised so far

$562.10

Clancy May Feuerriegel

Hannah Blackburn

Raised so far

$33.60

Yee Harn Teh

Raised so far

$2,497.55

Anna-Lena Tibud

Raised so far

$67.20

Amaya Stubbs

Raised so far

$127.05

Jenny Moy

Raised so far

$5.00

Angela Cooke

Raised so far

$26.25

Brendan Thomas

Raised so far

$247.00

John Sheridan

Raised so far

$2,014.10

Suzy O'Keefe

Raised so far

$352.00

Sarah Singh

Raised so far

$802.10

Michelle Clemson

Raised so far

$21.00

Bethany Carruthers

Tess Schwarz

Raised so far

$133.35

Breanna Swinnerton

Raised so far

$60.50

Matt Adams

Raised so far

$52.50

Sarah Robb

Raised so far

$127.80

Janice Quadrio

Raised so far

$58.80

Lauren Quigley

Raised so far

$422.30

Jodie Hansen

Raised so far

$622.95

Natalie Face

Raised so far

$568.45

Stacy Marlow

Raised so far

$15.75

Ebony Rendell

Raised so far

$326.85

Kaisey Croker

Raised so far

$52.50

Shireen Pivac

Raised so far

$395.95

Nicholas Douglas

Raised so far

$182.50

Aaron Quinnell

nathan patterson

Philip Sheather

Grace Coppe

Raised so far

$407.40

Wendy Johnson

Vicky Lette

Raised so far

$134.40

Cassandra Lazdins

Raised so far

$141.25

Kate Eltringham

Rebecca Kerr

Leslee Russell

Raised so far

$127.50

Kylie Bull

Raised so far

$511.40

Diana Melham

Raised so far

$77.70

Yolande Franklin

Raised so far

$299.40

Greg Brown

Angela Milek

Raised so far

$599.90

Natasha O’Neill

Raised so far

$182.20

Daniel Condon

Raised so far

$67.20

Michelle Ngo

Raised so far

$86.00

Caitlin Clarke

Raised so far

$2,672.95

Chloe Robinson

Jo Hurley

Raised so far

$105.00

Lane McKay

Raised so far

$238.35

Cath Griffin

Jonathan Taylor

Raised so far

$412.20

Katherine Ebenezer

Raised so far

$41.50

Lily Molin

Lily Skeet

Raised so far

$993.55

Sian Franz

Llinos Jones

Raised so far

$1,278.35

Troy O'Rourke

Raised so far

$40.00

Vivian Elazar

Raised so far

$2,390.15

Verity Steptoe

Jo Hutton-Davies

Raised so far

$105.00

Suzi Brotherton

Raised so far

$837.55

Carla Voyatzis

Raised so far

$82.75

Julian Borgert

Raised so far

$300.00

Charlotte Zabel

Raised so far

$211.00

Zoe Dewey

Ann Leinster

Raised so far

$431.55

Tori Anderson

Julie Chesworth

Raised so far

$157.50

Hayley Plageman

Raised so far

$1,183.75

Renee Lucas

Raised so far

$455.15

Elizabeth Morris

Raised so far

$301.35

Eleni Cassimatis

lily clark

Raised so far

$133.35

Erin Eccleston

Raised so far

$727.70

Lisa Nairn

Raised so far

$151.00

kate mcclure

Raised so far

$380.00

Amritha Jepsen

Ryan Lumpreiks

Nathan Ryan

Raised so far

$14,430.75

Tanya Hincksman

Raised so far

$67.20

Melanie Branford

Carolyn Moody

Raised so far

$1,179.40

Catherine Dimitrov

Elaine Biggar

Raised so far

$176.30

Clare Wilkinson

Raised so far

$141.70

Toby Sloan

Diane Roberts

Raised so far

$1,865.35

Chloe Larsen

Raised so far

$50.00

Jasmine Eccles

Raised so far

$116.60

Bree Alexander

Raised so far

$1,899.30

Amritha Jepsen

Miki Gallie

Ben Brugman

Amanda Reilly

Ellen de Man

Raised so far

$10.50

Tegan Sharman

Raised so far

$205.40

Nathan Walker

Raised so far

$274.00

Brent Davis

Raised so far

$391.90

Yossi Meyer

Keira Longmore

Deirdre McDonagh

Raised so far

$98.50

Scott Foreman

Harry Fisher

Raised so far

$16,498.29

Yasmin Kafcaloudes

Raised so far

$1,187.60

Leanne

Raised so far

$315.00

Debbie Mcintyre

Amanda Desmond

Raised so far

$1,054.65

Madison Pounder

Raised so far

$715.00

Jo Ehrlich

Raised so far

$72.50

Laura Schultz

Raised so far

$573.00

Aspasia Kordanouli

Raised so far

$60.69

Samantha Bidwell

Trish Fisher

Raised so far

$67.20

Carol Walters

Raised so far

$1,898.65

Janine Targett

Raised so far

$67.20

Isabel Adams

Alice West

Raised so far

$133.35

Joel O'Hara

Laura Andriollo

Erin Aldis

Raised so far

$116.58

Gina Coad

Raised so far

$67.20

Vanessa Simmonds

Raised so far

$163.05

Timothy Hampton

Raised so far

$610.00

Sophie Stein

Raised so far

$73.50

carolyn archer

Danielle Spowart

Raised so far

$288.35

Yvette Tancheff

Raised so far

$105.00

Alan Smith

Raised so far

$611.60

Kate Mudie

Raised so far

$605.00

Sheree Haynes

Raised so far

$165.90

Jeni Capaldo

Nicole Waters

Susie Goodall

Raised so far

$349.70

Josie Adcock

Raised so far

$731.85

Ross Chiswell

Raised so far

$514.80

Yvonne Mathieson

Raised so far

$632.50

Ronnie Douglas

Raised so far

$488.00

Belinda Wood

Raised so far

$61.00

Hester Van der Ryst

Jen McArdle

Raised so far

$48.60

Haylee Berrill

Raised so far

$141.00

Casey Reynolds

Raised so far

$561.80

Erin Leahy

Raised so far

$37.80

Cathie Plowman

Raised so far

$2,691.35

Grace Robertson

Raised so far

$67.20

Elisha Padezanin

Geoff Golledge

Raised so far

$799.20

Carolyn Malseed

Raised so far

$50.00

Analia Shearer

Raised so far

$1,369.30

Emily Gray

Peppy Seitanidou

Emily Ward

Raised so far

$378.50

Sally Gowing

Raised so far

$618.75

Alison Schneeberger

Raised so far

$715.00

Theresa McEwan

Raised so far

$189.00

Georgia Reid

Raised so far

$362.30

Karla Cronin

Raised so far

$67.20

Brooke Dillon

Tracey Lindsay

Raised so far

$67.20

Peita Weavell

Tara McCormack

Raised so far

$377.80

Vikas Sharma

Raised so far

$133.35

Kayla Ferguson

Raised so far

$78.75

Stephanie Newman

Raised so far

$126.00

Krysta Pearce

Amanda Corton

Raised so far

$291.50

Nik Booth

Liza Dixon

Raised so far

$499.60

Kevin Willacy

Raised so far

$433.65

Taylor Radford

Cass Burton

Michael McGarry

Raised so far

$21.00

Emma- Jayne Garland

Raised so far

$21.00

Beverley Margosis

Raised so far

$1,073.95

Angelique Rhodes

Raised so far

$1,296.65

Yana Guretti

Raised so far

$21.00

Giaan Evans

Raised so far

$685.75

Kirsty Lee

Raised so far

$184.00

Patricia Padilla

Kayla Hordern

Raised so far

$316.70

Kellie Banjanin

Kayla Hunt

Raised so far

$256.50

Tamahiri Broad

Samantha Horne

Maximus Goodwin

Raised so far

$90.30

Jelena Nikolaidis

Raised so far

$308.80

Sarah Leffley

Chloe Guellec

Ella Coxon

Emily Warland

Chloe Thomas

Raised so far

$518.45

Emily Judd

Laura Morales

Raised so far

$1,206.55

Briahnna Shannon

Zoe Buck

Keisha Davis

Raised so far

$219.00

Charlotte Blanch

Raised so far

$361.90

Abbey Jones

Raised so far

$1,058.80

Kate Facci

Raised so far

$225.25

Jack Murtagh

LajetReady

Molly Lloyd

Raised so far

$79.05

Jorja Waples

Lucia D'Onofrio

Raised so far

$399.00

Kye Belton

Raised so far

$50.00

Zoe Bacon

Renee Dunn

Raised so far

$738.45

Tiana Lucas

Erin Tozer

shakira pearce

Noah Robb

Shakira Taylor

Raised so far

$77.20

Izellah Chetcuti

Vedant Tyagi

Jack Appleton

Tracey Richardson

Raised so far

$10.50

Macayla Hole

Laura Hayes

indi venables

Raised so far

$145.95

logan Mcglynn

Raised so far

$36.00

Stacey Slattery

Lucy Hatch

Connor Parkin

Leanne Beer

Jess Hansford

Raised so far

$420.05

Milla Grosser

Jaxon West

Raised so far

$539.25

Jess Burgess

Raised so far

$660.95

Paula Baker (C)

Raised so far

$3,293.15

Graham Baker

Raised so far

$67.20

Isabelle

Heather van Velzen

Raised so far

$659.25

Porsche Lattanzio

penelope flower

Raised so far

$127.00

Lawry Woods

Raised so far

$2,483.05

Julia Amaro

Raised so far

$1,190.35

Nic Hargreaves

Holly Nuske

Raised so far

$10.00

Llewellyn Perryman

marisa giles

Tayla Goulter

Raised so far

$183.80

Emily Laing

Raised so far

$810.30

Chris Laing

Raised so far

$1,585.80

Simran Singh

Mathilde Anne

Clare Pitt

Raised so far

$149.20

Lily Boffa

Matilda Lawson

Kieren Moore

Raised so far

$97.70

Matt Sullivan

Raised so far

$254.80

Ella Preston

Nickola Fleming

Raised so far

$199.10

Kim Hodge

Raised so far

$1,227.55

Ellen Newton

Alexis Bailey

Raised so far

$1,244.70

Trevlyn Ryan

Melissa Broome

Jacqui Doloughan

Raised so far

$226.90

Jenna Black

Emma Richards

Jacynta Ladhams

Wayne Jackson

Shantelle Aguilar

Raised so far

$48.30

Amanda Hodge

Raised so far

$1.05

Leisa Robertson

Raised so far

$857.65

Patricia Goncalves

Abbey Reynolds

Raised so far

$52.50

Taya Dawe

Raised so far

$1,243.00

Clare Pollock

Cheryl Jorre de St Jorre

Raised so far

$728.75

Janet Gatland

Raised so far

$415.05

Tier Paton

Raised so far

$195.30

Renee English

Raised so far

$102.50

Tara Hoorn

Raised so far

$67.20

Emma DeRycke

Raised so far

$255.00

Kelly Weston

Raised so far

$185.85

Amity Krushka

Raised so far

$21.00

skye Millhouse

Greg Smith

felicity purdue

Raised so far

$379.50

Michael Storer

Raised so far

$800.10

Natalee Lavers

Raised so far

$1,457.85

Bron Goulding

Raised so far

$51.75

Cassie Willcox

Raised so far

$271.80

Gulshan Price

Raised so far

$649.40

Julien Wells

Julien Wells

Raised so far

$409.10

Belinda Hochen

Raised so far

$2,003.60

Samuel Scanlon

Raised so far

$1,226.65

Jodi Fitness

Raised so far

$815.10

Kearnesie

Raised so far

$806.20

Penelope McNally

Raised so far

$117.20

Josh Maggio

Sharon Nightingale

Raised so far

$62.50

Taylor Darby

Alyssa Stone

Raised so far

$451.55

Niamh Kelly

Raised so far

$78.80

Jeanette McLeod

Raised so far

$1,096.55

Jess Burns

Raised so far

$300.75

Bonnie Layton

Raised so far

$573.00

Lana Osborne

Raised so far

$5,043.75

Darren Linsley

Raised so far

$1,504.05

Sophie Kerr

Raised so far

$317.70

Jennifer Foster

Raised so far

$30.50

Madeleine Fielder

Raised so far

$427.65

Tanya Murphy

Raised so far

$222.20

Michelle Hancock

Raised so far

$52.50

Leigh Black

Raised so far

$1,370.30

Kerry Sutton

Raised so far

$36.00

Joanne Caverley

Raised so far

$81.75

Faith Seiuli-Brown

Danni Smith

Raised so far

$37.80

Melinda Aylett

Raised so far

$67.20

Nicole Radcliffe

Raised so far

$168.00

Joanna Williams

Leanne Leggett

Raised so far

$20.00

Joanne Downes

Nicholas Blackburn

Raised so far

$1,119.90

Mark Williams

Shirley Wilson

Raised so far

$2,603.95

Jessica Maloney

Raised so far

$75.60

Janna Horsburgh

Raised so far

$535.40

Sarah Ascencio-Lane

Raised so far

$84.00

Melissa Kinsman

Eunice Winship

Katrina Kelly

Raised so far

$52.50

Saxon Fisher

Raised so far

$289.65

Rebecca Evans

Nat Challis

Raised so far

$2,793.90

Jake Barnes

Raised so far

$2,190.85

Michelle Hunt

Raised so far

$1,367.15

Jasmine Cardno

Liisa Grace-Baun

Raised so far

$625.25

Maree Neill

Raised so far

$723.00

Jessica Lees

Raised so far

$655.35

Nang Wo Hom Kham

Brooke Cox

Gilli Barnard

Kelly Tracey

Daniel Mott

Raised so far

$162.75

Mark Jakubowicz

Lisa Perry

Raised so far

$22.05

Jeson unay

Vidya Sadawarte

Raised so far

$67.20

Amanda Smith

Raised so far

$69.30

Zak Masters

Raised so far

$318.15

Dakota Power

Raised so far

$113.00

Brendan Cassidy

Raised so far

$1,780.10

Jake Farr-Wharton

Anna Thomson

Raised so far

$2,148.00

Kelsey Wicks

Raised so far

$438.70

Sharon Stanbrough

Raised so far

$70.00

Mandolyn Leader

Raised so far

$26.25

Kaytlin Bodis

Raised so far

$116.60

Marine Robert

Danae Carlile

Elissa Sampson

Raised so far

$892.51

Joel Lefkovic

Raised so far

$556.30

Jed Campbell

Raised so far

$2,764.85

Kathie Taylor

Raised so far

$1,149.50

Elizabeth Cole

Raised so far

$1,445.35

Rebecca March

Raised so far

$636.20

Lisa Sanchez

Raised so far

$583.50

Lisa Robson

Raised so far

$86.00

Kevin Molan

Lisa Graham

Raised so far

$103.95

Bethany Edwards

Raised so far

$1,085.95

Trish Wilson

Raised so far

$702.30

Roshni Lal

Raised so far

$147.00

Lara Reed

Raised so far

$311.75

Georgia Mills

Heather McCarthy

Raised so far

$730.00

Antoniette Bugge

Raised so far

$2,079.40

Matthew Alchin

Raised so far

$281.40

Kyle O'Donnell

Raised so far

$93.50

Natasha Hardgrave

Maggie Taylor

Monica Mongia

Marie Wellard

Raised so far

$602.25

Amy Williams

Anthony Lynch

Summiar Eyers

Rachel Graham

Lauren Krollig

Brooke Humble

Raised so far

$3,922.50

David Di Salvio

Raised so far

$665.00

Hayley Winder

Raised so far

$101.95

Catherine Ho

Raised so far

$298.50

Fiona Sheehan

Kayla Trussell

Melanie Lasham

Raised so far

$140.50

pieter du plessis

Alana Sherwell

Karen Coleman

Anyela Johana Reyes Rubiano

Nathan Lobley

Glenda Van Den Haspel

Michelle Paterson

Danny Bearman

Jessica Woodberry

Ausana Thongsri

Hayley Jaensch

Raised so far

$3,193.60

Ella Lamrock

681 Web

Raised so far

$1,320.65

Kim Starkey

Raised so far

$662.40

Kristy Bingham

Amalie Taylor

Rachel Andersen

Raised so far

$205.25

Filippa Banfield

Raised so far

$2,588.25

Laura Hayes

Raised so far

$323.75

Frankie Morgan

Raised so far

$2,618.05

Anthony Basile

Raised so far

$431.00

Lisa Hogarth

Raised so far

$600.10

Jason Dickinson

Raised so far

$37.80

Mathew Lemme

Raised so far

$616.15

Kerry Newdick

Raised so far

$576.10

Jarrod Eckersley

Raised so far

$410.80

Rachel Harris

Raised so far

$346.50

Vanessa Bennett

Archy Archdall

Raised so far

$1,086.70

Nena Lane-Kirwan

Raised so far

$535.50

Isabella Coleman

Emily Hallas

Raised so far

$67.20

Hayley Dunphy

Akshay Devnani

Paula Dwyer

Raised so far

$535.95

Jeremy Reynolds

Raised so far

$116.50

Joanne Turville

Cara Hones

Raised so far

$272.80

Krystina Durdin

Raised so far

$67.20

Patrick Johnson

Raised so far

$200.00

Trish Moyle

Raised so far

$279.35

Russell Humphreys

Raised so far

$64.00